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marcuslee

The Name is Variable

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What's in a name? Well, the name of something can make all the difference in the world. I've come up with two names for my latest project, the text based simulation game. And, no, one of the names is not Variable. That was simply part of a catchy blog post title. If you have gotten this far, my clever (yet corny) name for this blog post worked.

The two names are as follows:

  • Perfect Harmony
  • Impact!


The exclamation point in Impact! is part of the name. Ha ha! Personally, I like the second one, Impact!, because it has a little bit more punch than Perfect Harmony. However, both of them convey the same idea that I would like to get across.

The text based simulation is all about variables and how they relate to each other. Each decision that is made in game will affect other variables. Some variables will go down, others up. Some will have a positive reaction, others negative. Some decisions will have mostly a positive effect on the game while others will have a large negative effect on one or more variables (though some other desired effect at the same time). Confused? Well, that's okay if you are.

In any case, it boils down to this: every decision that is made will have an Impact! in the game play with the goal of maintaining or achieving Perfect Harmony among all the variables.

So, which name do you like? Are there other cool names that I have not considered? Please share your thoughts.




Mark

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Categories
Gaming , Development

Comments

  1. ErosOlmi's Avatar
    What about !mpact!
  2. danbaron's Avatar
    Hi Marcus.

    From your picture, my guess is that you are a ventriloquist.

    I know that, at least in Ruby, a punctuation mark, or "=", can be used as the last character in a function name.

    Many years ago, I had an Apple IIc. I played commercial interactive fiction games on it, that were published by Infocom (see the first link below). What I really liked about them, was that they were completely text, there were no graphics at all. Text would appear on the screen, describing the situation, and then you had to type at a prompt at the bottom, asking a question, or saying what you wanted to do next. Then, more text would appear on the screen, dependent on what you had typed. It was similar to being a participant in a novel. Now, I see that the games were written in a LISP-like language - which makes sense, since they demonstrated, what seemed to me to be, pretty sophisticated AI. I know that I at least had, "A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy", "Zork I", and, "Suspended". As I remember, they were really good, especially, since the RAM was only 64k. The programs would continually load different parts from the floppy disk, which was also tiny. As I think about it now, it seems amazing what was done on such a relatively primitive system. To me, it shows that technology cannot compete with creativity. The games were very creative in both their plots, and their AI abilities. I much prefer to read rather than to watch a movie. I think that no movie can compete with one's own imagination of what is happening in a story. And, I absolutely cannot say that I enjoy computing as much now, as I did back then on the Apple IIc, using programmers' utilities from Beagle Bros (see the second link below).


    Dan

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infocom

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beagle_Bros
    Updated 15-11-2010 at 05:12 by danbaron
  3. marcuslee's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by ErosOlmi
    What about !mpact!
    I like it. I just might use it. Cheers to my European friend!
  4. marcuslee's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by danbaron
    Hi Marcus.

    From your picture, my guess is that you are a ventriloquist.
    Question is ... who's the dummy? What's really funny, though, is my son is a junior. Ha ha!

    Many years ago, I had an Apple IIc. I played commercial interactive fiction games on it, that were published by Infocom (see the first link below). What I really liked about them, was that they were completely text, there were no graphics at all. Text would appear on the screen, describing the situation, and then you had to type at a prompt at the bottom, asking a question, or saying what you wanted to do next. Then, more text would appear on the screen, dependent on what you had typed. It was similar to being a participant in a novel.
    I have heard of such things but have never played them myself. There are websites that do similar things using a browser/php/MySQL type construction. Usually there is too much of a learning curve for me to get into it, though.
  5. marcuslee's Avatar
    I think it might look even cooler if the first exclamation point is upside down. Plus, I put an accent on the A. What do you all think?








    Mark
    Updated 17-11-2010 at 07:47 by marcuslee
  6. ErosOlmi's Avatar
    Yes, the visual impact is nice but consider the difficulty to write it with upside down "!"
  7. marcuslee's Avatar
    That is true. Of course a simple version for quick reference could be your original suggestion: !mpact!

    As far as typing the inverted version, all you need to do is hold down ALT and type 173. That's the inverted exclamation point. The accented A is ALT + 0225.

    ˇmpáct!

    (Typed very quickly using the ALT/ASCII codes ... you just have to remember what the codes are if you are going to use it often!)



    Mark